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History of the Honda CBR

Posted by Mike Rosenfeld on

Sport bikes are built for speed, acceleration, braking, and cornering on paved roads. Some of the most popular sport motorcycles on the road are of the Honda CBR Series. This series includes a number of models which will be listed at the end of this blog.

For 20 years Honda has been successfully producing the CBR Series. Here is a look into how it all began.

With a goal set at defeating the RVF750 in the Suzuka 8 Hours Endurance Road Race, Honda developed a model that led to the production of the CBR900RR in 1992. In order to match the acceleration performance of competitors’ sport bikes, Honda increased the stroke of its inline 4-cylinder 750cc engine and raised displacement to 893cc. Adding to the CBR's  power performance were the bike’s dry weight of 185 kg and a  wheelbase of 1,405 mm. This bike was the total package and a riders dream. Honda was a pioneer of super sport bikes with a focus on superior handling and control. 

For the next twenety years Honda would go on to continuly and successfully improve the performance of the CBR. By the time Honda was designing its fourth generation of bikes a lot had changed. In 1998 80% of the parts from the 1996 - 1997 CBR900RR were redesigned. The dry weight was reduced to 180 kg thus improving the performance dynamically and keep the bike super lightweight. Riders were highly satisfied with this bikes performance and extra power thanks to the revamped engine settings that enhanced horsepower by 2PS to 130PS

Into the tenth generation CBR we have the CBR1000RR with the world's first Electronically Controlled Combined ABS for super sport bikes. With precise control of front-rear braking force distribution and ABS operation, the system works well with the vehicle characteristics that have been an issue with ABS on super sport bikes: the lightweight body, short wheelbase and high center of gravity that cause a pitching during acceleration and deceleration. Also the center positioning helps to reduce unsprung weight and concentrate mass,  preserving the super sport bike’s exceptional dynamic performance.

The twelfth generation CBR and CBR 20th anniversary gave us the 2012 CBR1000RR. This bike is designed with ease of handling, Front and rear suspensions were given new structures. The rear now has a a valve-less piston which slides inside the cylinder, pushing out oil that passes through a separate specialized component to generate damping force. The front uses a larger pressure-receiving area for smoother generation of damping force. The engine has revised fuel injection settings for better control when the throttle starts to open from fully closed, giving riders access to high power and peaceful riding.

CBR125R, CBR150

CBR250 (4 cyl.)

CBR250R/CBR300R (single)

CBR400, CBR400RR

CBR500F

CBR500R

CBR600F Hurricane, CBR600F2, CBR600F3, CBR600F4, CBR600F4i

CCBR125R, CBR150

CBR250 (4 cyl.)

CBR250R/CBR300R (single)

CBR400, CBR400RR

CBR500F

CBR500R

CBR600F Hurricane, CBR600F2, CBR600F3, CBR600F4, CBR600F4i

CBR600RR

CBR650F

CBR750 Hurricane, SuperAero

CBR1000F Hurricane

CBR900RR Fireblade

CBR929RR Fireblade

CBR954RR Fireblade

CBR1000RR Fireblade

CBR1100XX Super Blackbird

CBR929RR Fireblade

CBR954RR Fireblade

CBR1000RR Fireblade

CBR125R, CBR150

CBR250 (4 cyl.)

CBR250R/CBR300R (single)

CBR400, CBR400RR

CBR500F

CBR500R

CBR600F Hurricane, CBR600F2, CBR600F3, CBR600F4, CBR600F4i

CBR600RR

CBR650F

CBR750 Hurricane, SuperAero

CBR1000F Hurricane

CBR900RR Fireblade

CBR929RR Fireblade

CBR954RR Fireblade

CBR1000RR Fireblade

CBR1100XX Super BlackbirdSuper Blackbird

 


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